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Canterbury Cathedral


This twelfth century cathedral in Kent, England, is a famous pilgrimage site where Thomas Becket, the Archbishop of Canterbury from 1161 to 1170, was murdered on King Henry II's orders. However, it is the ghost of another Archbishop called Simon Sudbury that walks the Canterbury Cathedralcathedral to this day. Sudbury was also a murder victim, killed by Wat Tyler, the head of the Peasant's revolt, in 1381. Sudbury, a pale man with a long, gray beard, haunts the tower that bears his name.

Despite the fact that Sudbury was beheaded and his body is buried in a different place from his head, he does not appear as a headless ghost.

The cathedral is also said to be haunted by a monk who can be seen walking in the cloisters with a distant , thoughtful expression on his face.

There is a passage in the cathedral known as the Dark Entry which is haunted by Nell Cook, who was a servant of a canon of the cathedral. Nell was so angry with her employer after discovering that he was having an affair, she poisoned some food and killed the canon and his lover with it. As punishment for her crime, Nell was buried alive beneath the Dark Entry. Her spirit haunts the passageway to this day on dark Friday evenings. According to legend, anyone who is unfortunate enough to see the ghost of Nell Cook will die soon after.

 

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Do You believe in the Supernatural?  "Haunted Mansions of the World" is a collection of stories relating to many famous locations around the world - we hope you enjoy your visit.  The original Zurich Mansion is a collection of short stories which were created by Dr. Bruce Schmidt 'The Professor'.

 

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